FAFSA Archives - The Campaign for College Opportunity

Why Thousands of Eligible Students Fail to Complete Their FAFSA

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Each February, thousands of students across California will learn about obscure sounding tax terminology. Too often, whether a student can piece together enough knowhow about the tax code will determine if they learn about the help available to pay for college.

“What’s our adjusted gross income?”

“How do you count how many people are in our ‘household’?”

These are just two questions that parents and adults field from students as they start their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is the application required to determine eligibility for most financial aid programs that help cover college costs, ranging from student loans to Cal Grants, the state program in California that awards over $2 billion annually to help students afford college. Students in California must complete their entire FAFSA, running more than 100 questions long, before the Cal Grant deadline (March 2) to claim any state-based assistance for which they are eligible. Unfortunately, data on who does not complete the FAFSA depicts a grim reality: many of the students that stand to most benefit from college leave their money on the table, potentially incurring greater costs themselves or even worse –  not enrolling in college altogether due to the costs they face.

In 2016, The Campaign for College Opportunity set out to quantify the amount of Pell Grant funds left unused by California students, funds that would have otherwise helped low-income students pay for college. The results were staggering. We found that in 2014, more than 144,000 California high school graduates failed to complete a FAFSA, resulting in over $340 million going unclaimed and unused by eligible students. These are not funds that need to be won in the never-ending Congressional budget debates. These dollars are already allocated towards financial aid, but we have yet to make it enough of a priority to make sure they get to their end users – students. Read More

FAFSA Story Series: Annaly Medrano

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By: The Campaign for College Opportunity

Annaly Medrano is a 25 year-old Latina college student at San Bernardino Valley College, finishing her requirements to transfer to California State University, Sacramento. Her journey into higher education has been met with multiple obstacles, yet her passion for public policy and making a difference in the lives of future students has kept her motivated to complete her studies.

Annaly wasn’t able to complete her senior year of high school, but her mother encouraged her to attend community college to earn her GED.  Entering community college was a turning point for Annaly and she began to thrive academically. During that time frame, Annaly also discovered a learning disability, which qualifies her to receive special accommodations while taking exams–something that had gone undetected through primary school, but could have made a difference in her life. Read More

FAFSA Story Series: Izeah Garcia

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By: The Campaign for College Opportunity

Izeah Garcia is a 20 year-old first generation Mexican-American student completing his fourth year at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) with a political science major.

As the youngest of four boys, Izeah was the second in his family to graduate from high school and the first to attend college.  He credits three positive influences as helping him get to college:  his family’s encouragement,  “luck of the draw” mentorship he received along the way, and, of course, financial aid. Read More

School’s Plan to Create College Savings Accounts Reinvigorates Financial Literacy Debate

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College Affordability a Concern as Students Head Back to School!

 By Campaign for College Opportunity President Michele Siqueiros

As back-to-school season and the college application period approaches this fall, paying for college remains a concern facing many students and their families.

Even as the value of a college degree grows and more students are prepared and want to go to college, the cost of college is one of the biggest barriers low-income students face. At the Campaign we believe that family income should never keep a talented and hard-working American from the many opportunities possible before them. This is a quintessential American value that we must preserve and it is also why student aid is funded, including the federal Pell Grant, worth up to $5,700 per year for low-income student and Cal Grants, worth between $4,000 and $12,000 per year, depending on the type of institution the student attends. However, the broken process of applying for Pell and Cal Grants inadvertently sets up a new obstacle: a complex, redundant and poorly-timed federal financial aid form that can sometimes be an unnecessary hurdle for California students in need of aid in order to go to college.

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