University of California Archives - The Campaign for College Opportunity

University of California Makes Historic Decision to End Use of the SAT and ACT for Eligibility and Admission to their Campuses

Today, the University of California (UC) Regents voted unanimously (23-0) to improve college admissions by ending their reliance on the SAT and ACT in their admissions process. We applaud UC President Janet Napolitano and the Regents for this bold step in creating a more equitable admissions process that does not rely on racially biased admissions tests.

After several education advocates, researchers, and Regents cited that the SAT and ACT discriminate based on race/ethnicity and income during today’s UC Regents meeting, the Regents voted to extend the current test-optional model—instituted due to restricted access to testing brought on by COVID-19—for another two years before going test-blind, a model where the SAT and ACT will not be used in admissions at all. Student Regent Jamaal Muwwakkil had a message for those concerned about measures to increase diversity at the institution: “Prestige has been juxtaposed with diversity and selectivity with equity, and I don’t know if that aligns with who we want to be in the future.”

“The University of California’s decision sends a clear message that biased, pay-to-play admissions tests will no longer be tolerated,” said Michele Siqueiros, Campaign for College Opportunity president.  “After years of research pointing to the racial and income biases of these tests that fuel a billion-dollar industry more concerned with profits than fairness, coupled with the recent College Admissions Scandal, it is time for colleges and universities across the country to do more than simply talk about their ‘Commitments to Diversity.’  They must finally act on them by eliminating admissions practices that discriminate based on a student’s zip code, income status, and race/ethnicity.” Read more. 

Governor Newsom’s 2020-21 May Revision Budget Proposal Warns of Nearly $2 Billion in Draconian Cuts to Higher Education if Federal Government Fails to Assist California

STATEMENT BY MICHELE SIQUEIROS, PRESIDENT

Governor Newsom had difficult decisions and serious cuts to make in this 2020-21 budget proposal, and it is clear things will get significantly worse if the federal government fails to provide needed assistance.

We call on Congress and the President to invest in a rapid economic recovery, by providing deserved federal assistance to our state in recognition that there cannot be an American recovery, without a California one.

In his updated budget proposal, Governor Newsom is responding to the economic challenges brought on by COVID-19 and eliminates many of his January proposals to expand enrollment funding for our public colleges and universities. Without aid from the federal government, California’s community colleges and universities stand to lose nearly $2 billion: $388 million at the University of California, $398 million at the California State University, and a total of $1.09 billion at the community colleges. Read more

Dan Schnur on UC scandal: ‘The key is providing another set of eyes… without compromising their academic independence’

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UC proposes first tuition increase in six years for more faculty, courses and financial aid

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African-American college enrollment drop in CA steep since 2011

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Why are public colleges and universities enrolling too many out-of-state students?

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Bill aims to increase college readiness among state’s low-income students

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Press Statement: Statement on the Introduction of SB 1050 (de Leon)

Increasing the number of California K-12 students eligible for the state’s public universities and ensuring seats for California students at the University of California

Today, California Senate pro Tempore Kevin de León (Los Angeles) introduced visionary legislation that ensures a student’s zip code or income status does not determine whether they are adequately prepared and get the opportunity to go to college.

Now more than ever, California needs more students to earn a bachelor’s degree – our economy demands it. By 2030, 38% of all jobs will require at least a bachelor’s degree. But if current trends persist, only 33% of adults will hold a bachelor’s degree leaving the workforce 1.1 million bachelor degree holders short. Businesses need more college educated workers and students know they need more than a high school diploma to realize their full potential and make it into the middle class.

Read the Entire Press Statement