Jocelyn Correa

Public Affairs Fellow
University of California, Los Angeles
Pronouns: she/her

What do you do at the campaign? I support the Outreach team in developing and implementing outreach strategies that engage stakeholders and strengthen coalitions among students, administrators, advocates, and policy makers.

What else gets you up in the morning? Being excited about the possibilities that each day brings. I see each day as an opportunity to learn something new, to help others, and to be better than I was yesterday.

What do you do in your down time? ? I am spending time with my friends and family, playing the ukulele, or watching Netflix.

Fun fact: My name means joyful or happy in Latin.

Formal Bio:
Jocelyn received her bachelor’s degree from UCLA with a major in Political Science and minors in Global Studies and Chicana/o Studies. She intends on pursuing a master’s degree in Public Policy and aspires to run for local office one day because she wants to work towards addressing the most pressing issues in Los Angeles and focus on community development through an intersectional lens.

Although there are several issues she cares about and is determined to advance, including immigrant rights, womxn & LGBTQ+ rights,housing affordability, and criminal justice reform, her most compelling policy area of interest is education. Jocelyn believes that social justice should begin in educational institutions and that education is connected to larger issues in society including poverty, inequality, and incarceration.

Jocelyn’s passion for social justice and educational equity largely stem from the obstacles she faced throughout her educational journey as a low-income, first generation, Latina student, and former English Learner. Her Chicano/a studies minor further sharpened her perception of injustice and institutional racism, motivating her to influence positive systemic change through policy. Jocelyn joined the Campaign because she admires the organization’s unwavering commitment to advocating for policies that increase accessibility to postsecondary education. She wholeheartedly believes that every student deserves the opportunity to attend college and receive a quality education regardless of their zip code and is excited to support reform efforts that make higher education more affordable, attainable, and accessible for historically underrepresented and underserved groups.